New Seeds This Year

Displaying seeds 61 - 75 of 105 in total
  1. Ipomoea tricolor wedding bells
    New

    IPOMOEA TRICOLOR 'WEDDING BELLS'

    This extremely rare and quite fantastic Morning Glory is reported to have been recently saved from near extinction and so we are keen to encourage its resurrection. Gorgeous, impressively large lavender blooms shine out making a stunning display, but why not consider enhancing it further by growing it in combination with another climber, or a rambling rose. Prefers rich soil and prefers to keep its feet in the shade. ... Learn More

    $5.52

  2. Kiwi hem 1
    New

    KIWI FRUIT HERMAPHRODITE

    These vigorous climbing vines, with large exotic-looking leaves are easily grown to produce hundreds of sweet fruits ranging from the size of a small plum to the same size as a hen's egg! They can also make a useful screen to cover a dead tree, the new shoots produced each summer growing 10 to 15 feet or more. These few seeds have been collected from self-fertile plants and should inherit this characteristic. Stems should be cut back during the winter months, and the rooting area mulched with manure ensuring a yearly abundance of fruit. As a rule we wait for the autumn and early winter to strip the vines of leaves before collecting the fruits, which by then have all ripened to full sweetness. Our vines here exist on a cold windy hilltop and have withstood nearly 30 years shrugging off countless severe frosts ... Learn More

    $3.49

  3. Ligustrum vulgare flower
    New

    LIGUSTRUM VULGARE

    Clusters of fragrant white flowers open from June onwards and matt-black berries ripen in autumn lasting for most of the winter and are popular food for birds. A popular evergreen garden hedging plant, it has small, oval, glossy green leaves and smooth bark. In the wild Privet grows in hedgerows, woodland edges and grassland scrub, usually on well-drained calcareous soils. It is also the main food plant of the Privet Hawk-moth and provides cover for small birds and other animals. ... Learn More

    $3.11

  4. Lobelia bequaertii
    New

    LOBELIA BEQUAERTII

    An attractive, short-trunked, compact rosette of broad, stiff, blue-green, reddish centred leaves, appears from a deep, branching underground rhizome. This extremely pretty and unique spectacle slowly grows in size, until, after several years, an impressive, large, terminal, cone-like inflorescence with recurved bracts shoots upwards, and is finally pollinated by birds. Very rarely seen or offered as viable seed, this amazing plant grows in the alpine zone of the Ruwenzori Mountains in Zaire and Uganda between 3000 and 3500 m, where the extreme climate is usually clear and cold in the mornings, with intense sunshine, and cloudy or foggy in the afternoons with frost at night. Daytime temperatures are usually only a few degrees above freezing, and in a similar way to many bromeliads, the leaf rosette holds a reservoir of water among the tightly fitted leaves, which is key to its survival in this inhospitable habitat. In cultivation, the giant Lobelias are extremely rare, and will do best outside in temperate, highly oceanic climates such as Ireland, New Zealand, southern Chile or the coastal Northwestern of the U.S. Otherwise they make stunning pot plants if slowly potted on until they flower. Viable seed difficult to collect and very, very scarce indeed. ... Learn More

    $5.02

  5. Lobelia gregoriana subsp gregoriana
    New

    LOBELIA GREGORIANA

    Remarkably similar to the Puya of the Andes in South America or Echium wildpretii from the island of Tenerife, this giant unrelated rosette plant displays the evidence of parallel evolution, producing similar looking plants as they evolve in similar habitats. Although the dark maroon to black flowers are attractive, they are almost completely hidden within the bracts. This rare and astonishing plant is native to wetter spots in the alpine zone of Mount Kenya between 3300 and 4600 m, where the extreme climate is usually clear and cold in the mornings, with intense sunshine, and cloudy or foggy in the afternoons with frost at night. Daytime temperatures are usually only a few degrees above freezing, and in a similar way to many bromeliads, the leaf rosette holds a reservoir of water among the tightly fitted leaves, which is key to its survival in this inhospitable habitat. In cultivation, the giant Lobelias are extremely rare, and will do best outside in temperate, highly oceanic climates such as Ireland, New Zealand, southern Chile or the coastal Northwestern of the U.S. Otherwise they make stunning pot plants if slowly potted on until they flower. Viable seed difficult to collect and very scarce indeed. ... Learn More

    $5.02

  6. Lonicera alpigena
    New

    LONICERA ALPIGENA

    Dark, blood-red flowers are followed by large numbers of cherry-red berries which are sprinkled liberally over the entire plant giving a pleasing effect. Cultivated since the 16th Century, this attractive deciduous shrub has dark green, shining leaves, and is found in the wild in woods and stony places in the mountains of Europe. Normally a medium-sized shrub, it can be easily clipped to maintain its dwarf stature, under 3ft if required, making it a good hedging plant. ... Learn More

    $3.37

  7. Lonicera ciliosa
    New

    LONICERA CILIOSA

    In early summer clusters of up to twenty tubular, bright orange, fragrant flowers open, arranged in whorls and blooming at the branch tips, fruiting later as attractive clusters of red-orange berries. This strong climbing honeysuckle, native to the western and southern states of the USA is happiest in partial shade and will tolerate moist or dry soils, where it will even scramble over the ground at soil level if giving nothing to climb upon. ... Learn More

    $3.49

  8. Malus pumila
    New

    MALUS PUMILA (WILD APPLE)

    One of the most common fruits in temperate climates. The wild apple has been collected for thousands of years and later bred in many different lines each with their own desired characteristics. ... Learn More

    $3.37

  9. Noimage
    New

    MALVA MOSCHATA MIX

    A generous packet of a mixture of both white and pink forms of these two easy-to-grow, long-lived cottage garden plants. Musky-perfumed, bowl-shaped flowers profusely stud the stems which are clad in soft green fingered leaves. "One of our most beautiful natives." (Graham Stuart Thomas) This gem will gently self-seed only if it is happy. ... Learn More

    $3.05

  10. Maurandya antirhinifolia
    New

    MAURANDYA ANTIRHINIFOLIA

    Maurandya antirrhiniflora, known as roving sailor or (along with other similar species) climbing snapdragon, is a scrambling or climbing herbaceous perennial native to Mexico and the south western United States (California to Texas) where it grows in a variety of relatively dry habitats. It has more-or-less triangular untoothed leaves and tubular flowers in various shades of pink, red or blue to violet with white bases. ... Learn More

    $3.68

  11. Noimage
    New

    MAURANDYA ANTIRRHINIFLORA

    A rapid-growing scrambler, Maurandya antirrhiniflora, known as roving sailor or climbing snapdragon, is a scrambling or climbing herbaceous perennial native to Mexico and the south-western United States (California to Texas) where it grows in a variety of relatively dry habitats. It has more-or-less triangular untoothed leaves and tubular flowers in various shades of pink, red or blue to violet with white bases. ... Learn More

    $3.37

  12. Nelumbo nucifera
    New

    NELUMBO NUCIFERA

    Large, luscious, pink tipped waxy petals adorn the famous "Sacred Lotus", a magnificent aquatic perennial. Amazingly, unlike other water lilies, both the flowers and leaves are able to grow upwards above the water for a considerable height, on strong stiff stems, accentuating their amazing beauty! In addition, the sizeable peltate leaves have a remarkable water repellent characteristic that serves as a self-cleaning mechanism, the whole plant making an interesting and noteworthy addition to any pond. Although it has been long-considered a close relative of the Water Lily, a noticeable difference is the large and quite bizarre ice-cream cone shaped receptacle at the centre of the plant. The terminal buds of lotus roots in pools begin to bud when the temperature rises to above 13 degrees Celsius in early April. In mid- and late May, the leaves grow above the water. In early and mid-June, blooming starts. In late June and mid-August, they reach full bloom. In early September, the last flowering period starts. And so, finally, for the botanists amongst you, recent molecular research has surprisingly shown that its closest living relatives are the plane trees and members of the protea family (Proteaceae). Indeed, their isolated phylogenetic position indicates that both Nelumbo and Platanus may be living fossils (the only survivors of an ancient and formerly much more diverse group). So you are now able to grow a Dinosaur plant in your pond! Fresh seeds rarely offered. ... Learn More

    $6.29

  13. Paeonia pot luck mix
    New

    PAEONIA POT LUCK MIX

    An interesting mix of herbaceous peonies in a range of colours and forms including some hybrids. These have been supplied by keen growers, and many unusual hybrids will be here, so lots of fun to be had here as seedlings develop and mature to reveal their true identities. We'd love to tell you what's in here, but we don't know!!! ... Learn More

    $6.03

  14. Paeonia tree form mixture
    New

    PAEONIA TREE FORM MIXTURE

    An adventure into the unknown with this mix of several unidentified or hybrid tree peony forms supplied by keen growers and customers. All of these will slowly produce trunks and grow bigger by the year, and are ideal for the curious gardener who will enjoy the anticipation as the plants mature and reveal their glory by opening their first flowers. ... Learn More

    $5.02

  15. Papaver paeonyflorum white cloud
    New

    PAPAVER PAEONIFLORUM 'WHITE CLOUD'

    These impressive peony poppies display large double-flowered heads in beautiful creamy white and will brighten up any gaps in your border from June until August. They are slightly shorter in stature than most opium poppies and so you might want to consider a spot nearer to the front. ... Learn More

    $3.37

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